Equal parts pop band and living art installation, Candy Says are the curveball to end all curveballs.

http://www.thehandsomepress.co.uk/post/82006925838/candy-says-interview-introducing-candy-says (via candysaysit)

This was a great interview to write. It’s so fun when someone asks good questions…

Star Wars Symphonic Suite—Jelani Eddington at the Sanfilippo Wurlitzer (by R. J. Eddington)

Simply astounding.

Guide to Getting Online with an Amstrad CPC 464 (from 1984) in 2013 (by Am Strad)

Amazing. This guy seems very stoned, but he has connected his CPC464 to a BBS. Which is pretty cool.

austinkleon:

Map from Victor Papanek’s Design for the Real World

What a great looking book. Want.

austinkleon:

Map from Victor Papanek’s Design for the Real World

What a great looking book. Want.

So amusing that we were tipped in the Evening Standard because Jules met David Smyth at the Mercury Awards then tweeted our song at him. It’s all about who you know…

So amusing that we were tipped in the Evening Standard because Jules met David Smyth at the Mercury Awards then tweeted our song at him. It’s all about who you know…

New @darkfurs EP. Digging it.

solobasssteve:

a new solo video, filmed by basstheworld.com - this was filmed at the Frankfurt Musikmesse, and is an improvised piece, without any looping or cleverness :) 

I have no idea how this works, but clearly Steve is a complete mutant at the bass guitar.

candysaysit:

Favourite Flavour is featured in the latest edition of Ramen Music. If you haven’t seen it before, check it out. It’s a magazine-style subscription service for new music, but the genius part is that you can share each edition completely (no snippets or paywalls). So go and listen!

Oh, and they pay the bands. Which is unheard of.

I’m seriously impressed with Ramen. Their model of subscriptions with completely open sharing of editions is awesome.

candysaysit:

Favourite Flavour is featured in the latest edition of Ramen Music. If you haven’t seen it before, check it out. It’s a magazine-style subscription service for new music, but the genius part is that you can share each edition completely (no snippets or paywalls). So go and listen!

Oh, and they pay the bands. Which is unheard of.

I’m seriously impressed with Ramen. Their model of subscriptions with completely open sharing of editions is awesome.

We may change the way we access and engage with these records but, just as theatre and books have survived the onslaught of technology, so too will the album. There are some messages that can only be expressed over the course of a dozen songs with a slightly boring bit around tracks five and six – that’s just the way we’ve engineered our society to be.

Emily Reo Live on KUCI 88.9fm “Wind + Peach” (by KUCI 88.9 FM)

A masterclass in dreaminess. I want those machines…

A strange mania governs the people of our great nation, a mania that these days results in many individual and collective miseries. This is the love of opinion, of free speech—a furious mania for free, spoken opinion. It exhausts us.

n 1: Against the Rage Machine

I like reading n+1 sometimes. This article is good.

More writers today are paying bills with their craft than at any other time in human history.

The Report – Author Earnings

A thorough and fascinating analysis of Amazon’s chart data which suggests that self-publishing is the way to go.

Stay Home, Elizabeth (Official Video) (by Reichenbach Falls)

Fairy lights and drunken weeping on Port Meadow. Just in case you were under the illusion that Reichenbach Falls was a cheerful band. Oh no.

80 plays

I spent a couple of hours fiddling with the OP-1 on the plane back from San Francisco last night. It’s incredible how much it can do and how intuitive a lot of it is (definitely worth reading the manual thought). Here’s my Hello World – not the most wonderful example of what’s possible, but at least it might make a good backing track for the folk dance section of a Balkan Eurovision entry.

Track art by mediawench (CC BY-NC-SA)

We are Huxleying ourselves into the full Orwell.

mostlysignssomeportents:

Try as I might, I can’t shake the feeling that 2014 is the year we lose the Web. The W3C push for DRM in all browsers is going to ensure that all interfaces built in HTML5 (which will be pretty much everything) will be opaque to users, and it will be illegal to report on security flaws in them…

This is not good. Not good at all…